Inlays & Onlays

Provisional restorations for inlays and onlays can certainly be fabricated with the same materials used for crowns and bridges. However, direct placed materials, especially for inlays, can usually be done faster and more conveniently. This is particularly true for the light-cured materials for these restorations. They are designed to be placed directly into the preparation without a matrix or cement. Due to their semi- flexible (when cured) nature, a provisional fabricated from one of these materials should be relatively easy to remove at cementation time. Merely engage the provisional at one of the line angles or penetrate the occlusal with a sharp spoon and pop it out. Sometimes, however, they need to be removed in sections. If you placed a glass or resin ionomer or composite to block out undercuts, that section of the preparation should first be lubricated with a separator. Occlusion can easily be adjusted with an Enhance or similar disc or finishing bur. Be sure to tell the patient not to floss. In addition, none of these materials is indicated for extended use since they wear rather rapidly.

Sensitivity

Due to the flexibility of these materials (specifically the light-cured products), patients may experience sensitivity when chewing. This is handled by informing the patient that the sensitivity may occur and that it has no clinical significance. Sensitivity can be controlled by cleaning and disinfecting the cavity with a cavity cleaner/disinfectant solution, which is dried in the preparation (not rinsed out) prior to placement of the provisional material.

Tests

Scrape Test

A deep cure can save time since only one increment of material would be necessary. We tested the depth of cure of our light-cured materials using the scrape test method in a Class II preparation, 7.5mm in depth. They were then light-cured with a halogen light for various times and any uncured material from the bottom of the sample was scraped off with a sharp scaler. We then measured the thickness of the remaining material. While this type of test is not a definitive depth of cure test and certainly would not be acceptable for a definitive restoration, it is more than adequate for a provisional. The results of these tests are listed in the commentary for each material.

Effect on Bond Strength

One of the most important benefits of these materials is the more ideal condition of the dentin surface when the provisional is removed. When a provisional that has been cemented with a zinc oxide-based cement is removed, cleaning the preparation can be a nuisance and can affect the ultimate adhesion of the definitive restoration. The only exception to this situation is when a resin-based provisional cement is used. But these flexible provisionals leave no residue when they are removed, which is a significant advantage. We tested the bond strength to dentin after these materials had been in contact for one week compared to an untreated control. The results of these tests are listed in the commentary for each product.

Translucency/Opacity

Discs in 2.0mm thicknesses were measured for relative degrees of translucency/opacity in a spectrophotometer. The scale is 0 - 100, with 0 being totally clear and 100 being totally opaque. Our findings are in each product's commentary.

6 results - showing 1 - 6
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Clip Flow
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PS-Clip
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Tempit-web
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Tempit-LC-Tube_shdw
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E-ZT4_A12_Inlay_Onlay_Kit
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