Lights

The ability to communicate with the lab concerning shades is the main use for these instruments. You hold the light in front of the patient's mouth and compare the teeth to the shade tabs. This supposedly negates the effect of different lighting on color perception. If your lab uses color-corrected lighting, these lights should allow both of you to see the same shade identically. So do we really need one of these instruments? Even if your office has color-corrected overhead lighting, these instruments will probably be of some value, especially with the "hard shade" cases. On the other hand, if you have conventional fluorescent or incandescent lighting, their value rises.

Note that full-spectrum, color-corrected overhead lighting, when compared to normal fluorescent bulbs, has also been found to increase the productivity of people. Therefore, we recommend that, at the very least, patient treatment areas should be illuminated with color-corrected lighting. Its only drawback is cost, which is significantly higher compared to conventional indoor lighting.

Shade matching lights in general can be tricky to use. They may produce too much glare, which can throw off even the most earnest attempts to record an accurate shade. This glare is one of the reasons we continue to recommend using color-corrected fluorescent lighting in your ceiling fixtures as a backup.

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RL2 HI CRI (3)
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Rite-lite
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New Trueshade Unit
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